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Posted by on Mar 28, 2014 in Truck Accidents | 0 comments

Truck Accident Attorney Recovers $11 Million Verdict

Suffering injuries in a truck accident can be a devastating experience to go through. The fact of the matter is that truck accident victims are rarely in a position to be able to afford the costs of medical treatment, loss of income, or other expenses that they may have to deal with as a result of their injuries. For this reason, truck accident victims are often in a position where pursuing compensation from those responsible for their injury may be the only way to get their lives back together.

A recent case from Texas illustrates the ways in which a personal injury suit for truck accident damages can help those whose lives have been impacted by this type of situation. The family of Daniel Rhodes, who died in a truck accident in 2011, was represented by attorney Jim Hart of the Williams Kherkher law firm in Houston, Texas. Hart was able to successfully argue that the companies for which the driver of the truck was working had failed to train him properly, leading to the tragic loss of Daniel Rhodes’ life after the truck driver attempted a dangerous maneuver in trying to return to the road.

The jury in the case found in favor of the plaintiffs and awarded a total of damages in the amount of $11 million, though the two parties afterwards settled out of the court for an undisclosed sum. Nevertheless, this case illustrates how critical the role of a qualified legal professional can be in helping the victims of truck accidents to fight for justice.

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Posted by on Feb 26, 2014 in Electromagnetism | 0 comments

The Definition and History of Electromagnetism

Electromagnetism is a fundamental force in nature that establishes the internal properties of all things on Earth. It is a phenomenon that is manifested in the interrelationship between electricity and magnetism, and the interaction of electrons and photons at the atomic and molecular level. The theory confirms that one can be produced by the other and also explains the nature of light.

Electromagnetism is a relatively modern concept. Prior to the 19th century, scientists believed that magnetism and electricity were distinct forces. It was not until scientists from Denmark (Hans Christian Ørsted), France (André-Marie Ampère) and England (Michael Faraday) worked out the dynamics that inextricably linked electricity and magnetism that the idea it was a single force piqued scientific interest. This was formally synthesized in 1865 into the electromagnetic theory by Scottish mathematician and physicist James Clark Maxwell, who had been tasked to transcribe Faraday’s experiments in electricity and magnetism into mathematical terms.

In his set of equations, Maxwell demonstrated that electricity and magnetism traveled in distinct waves through space, and that light itself is the result of the undulations of the electromagnetic waves which travelled at the same velocity as light. Together, electricity, magnetism, and light comprise the electromagnetic field.

However, Maxwell’s publication only became accepted outside of England when Heinrich Hertz, a German physicist, verified his equations in 1886. To add insult to injury, it was only in 1905 when the Theory of Relativity proposed by Albert Einstein that it cemented the notion that electricity and magnetism were two sides of the same coin, although they are by no means the same force.

The significance of the electromagnetic theory is that it became the basis for many of the theories in advanced physics, including quantum mechanics, which speculates on the properties of nano particles in relation to the physical world. Because these particles are so small, they can only be detected by how it affects the electromagnetic field.

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Posted by on Feb 23, 2014 in Electromagnetism | 0 comments

Practical Applications of Electromagnetism

The fact of the electricity and magnetism interrelationship being discovered to give way to electromagnetism is hugely relevant when it comes to practical applications in modern life. True, it is the basis for the nebulous and largely theoretical worlds of quantum physics and quantum mechanics, but the fact is for most people it is what makes the world go around.

The basic principle behind how electromagnetism is generated is the core concept of household electricity. The fact that we can turn the power on and off at will is a convenience that we all take for granted but is actually a crucial part of modern living. Because an electromagnetic field produces the energy that makes any gadget or appliance work, its continued presence is necessary to keep the machine or motor going. It is only through the passing of an electrical current that this electromagnetic field can be generated, the modern householder can control when that field is produced by simply flipping a switch. This in turn cuts off or supplies the electrical current that drives the electromagnetic field. Voila! Power at the flick of a finger!

Gadgets that make use of electromagnetism exploit the fact that the flow of electricity dictates when the magnetic field is energized, thus having control of this flow makes the gadget work as needed. An electromagnet is typically constructed of an iron core with a conductor such as copper wound around it which will carry the current that will activate the magnetic field. The strength of the field will depend on the amount of current that passes through the copper coil. A good example would be those large magnets that move heavy metal objects around a junkyard. An electric current energizes the magnet, causing metal to get attracted so that they can be moved. Once the object is in position, the electric current is cut off, causing the magnet to de-energize and release the object.

Common household appliances also use electromagnetism to work, such as televisions, electric fans, door bells, electronic door locks, loudspeakers, audio and video tapes, computers, and storage devices. Mobile phones would not be possible without electromagnetic pulses to carry the signals, and in the medical field, it is used in diagnostic equipment such as the Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scans. Electromagnets are also used for magnetic levitation (Maglev) trains.

These are just a few of the more obvious uses of electromagnetism. With technology and science developing at lightning speeds, it is entirely possible that there will be more uses for electromagnetism in the future. Right now, it is a crucial part of daily life.

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Posted by on Feb 20, 2014 in Electromagnetism | 0 comments

The Core and Electromagnetism

Perhaps one of the more interesting movies electromagnetically speaking is The Core. The basic premise of the movie is that the Earth’s outer core, supposedly the third layer of what makes up the planet, which is believed to be in constant motion, has stalled due to human interference. As a result, the electromagnetic field that surrounds the earth protecting it from the destructive power of the Sun’s cosmic rays has become unstable, creating earthquakes, electrical failure, and general breakdown of basic electronic technology, including pacemakers. The disruption has also caused birds to lose their sense of direction and sends them careening into stone statues to die in front of small children in parks. The mission of the protagonists is to jump start the planet by detonating a series of nuclear bombs at strategic points in the liquid iron of the outer core.

The Earth does have a protective magnetic field around it that protects the surface from being inundated by powerful solar rays that can cause, at the least, serious personal injury from radiation. The website of the Ausband & Dumont Law Firm in Atlanta says that people are sometimes also injured or contract illnesses from man-made radiation sources. An electromagnetic field is generated from the motion of charged particles, and in the case of the outer core, it is the extremely high heat that sets the charged particles in motion. It is also true that this continuous motion of the liquid metal in the outer core does generate this protective field, which extends to about 78 miles up from the crust (surface of the Earth).  Occasionally, fluctuations in the field let in more cosmic rays than usual, affecting communications, power grid networks, and satellite reception, which was demonstrated in the first part of the movie.

It should be noted there are some points in the movie that reeks of bad science, such as the existence of amethysts in the mantle, which is in turn posited to be mostly empty space. While scientists have yet to penetrate to the mantle, known scientific facts make these suggestions highly improbable. However, the movie does base most of its propositions on sound principles, save for the fact that the motion of outer core could be stopped or restarted with existing technology.

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Posted by on Feb 17, 2014 in Electromagnetism | 0 comments

Electromagnetism and Health

There has been a growing concern that because of the proliferation of electrical and electronic gadgets, humans have become more frequently exposed to electromagnetic fields (EMF) at dangerous levels. Reports of increased incidence of anxiety, headaches, decreased sexual appetite, nausea and fatigue have been suggested to have been caused by long-term EMF exposure in the home. These include such homely accoutrements as televisions, microwave ovens, cable, computers, radars, and mobile phones as well as power lines and nuclear power plants.

In general, the average person is exposed to constant doses of low-frequency, non-ionizing  EMFs, and there is no evidence to suggest that this has an adverse cumulative effect on the health. The body itself runs on tiny bursts of electrical current resulting from biochemical reactions natural to normal bodily functions.

This is of course a lot lower than the electric current that runs through a construction site worker who accidently touches an exposed live wire, which can certainly pose a significant health threat. For the average person, however, constant low-frequency EMF exposure is generally safe, even when standing (without actual contact) beneath a high voltage power lines.

This bears special mention because there have been allegations that proximity to power lines increases the risk of developing childhood leukemia.  Despite numerous studies into the matter (approximately 25,000 and counting), there has been no conclusive evidence that this is so, although it may be prudent to err on the side of caution and avoid prolonged exposure to these areas when possible.

This is not to say that EMFs have no effect on the human body. It induces currents to circulate and depending on how strong the magnetic field is can stimulate muscles and nerves and interfere with biological processes. Overall, however, the body is able to cope with EMF exposure provided it is at non-ionizing levels such as is found in normal everyday life.

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